Monthly Archives: October 2013

ATTENTION: ALL OFFICIAL INSPECTION STATIONS - SAFETY INSPECTION BULLETIN

PennDOT released a bulletin that serves to advise you that there are many updates and changes throughout chapter 175 of the Vehicle Equipment and Inspection Regulations. A Chapter 175 Regulation Comparison Chart is available to download from our website below. You should review it in its entirety as you will be responsible for complying with all regulation changes; they take effect October 26, 2013 Chapter 175 Comparison Chart The Chapter 175 Comparison Chart has the text from the existing manual and the updated changes side by side in an easy-to-follow format with each sub-chapter clearly defined. The new, updated publication 45, Vehicle Equipment and Inspection Regulations, will be available before the end of 2013; the changes detailed in the chart will be in effect and enforced prior to the new publication’s release

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Analysis of Technician Supply in the Collision Industry 2013

The availability of qualified repair technicians in the collision repair industry is an ongoing concern for shop owners and operators in recent years and appears that it will continue to be for the foreseeable future. There are a variety of factors that have contributed to the shortage of qualified technical employees in the industry. They include: An Aging Workforce Increased Competition for Employees Shifting Market Share to Larger Shops Turnover (both inter-industry, and extra-industry) Shrinking Workforce in an Industry with Increasing Demand 1) An Aging Workforce – In 2013 the average collision repair technician is 39 years old according to I-CAR’s Education Foundation. According to the same study, 48% of the technical workforce falls between the ages of 36 and 55. In a job with the physical demands of collision repair the 83,136 technicians in the US that are between the ages of 36 and 55 will start leaving th ... read more

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Technician’s Operating Procedure in Four Easy Steps

If you don’t already have one, one of the best things you can do for your business is to create a Technician’s Operating Procedure. By having such a procedure in place, every technician in your shop will approach, execute and close out every job, every time, in the same format. STEP ONE: One of the first things to do when a customer comes in with a complaint is to perform a test drive. Whenever possible, the technician should ride along while the customer drives. Often, the customer is more likely to reproduce the complaint than the technician can. Make sure during the test drive that the radio is off, as well as any other accessories and the blower fan; this will help in hearing any noises that may be part of the customer’s complaint. However, even before the test drive, the technician should examine the vehicle for existing damage and/or items that are missing. Anything that is not the norm should be reported to the service writer before the t ... read more

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Go to College or Don’t Go to College? (The Skills Gap)

A question we as parents and our children struggle with at some time in our life, or do we? I would challenge you that we don’t! We hear every day President Obama and other leaders in our country repeat over and over we need our kids to get a college education. Despite the fact that not every student is college material we think because of what we’re being indoctrinated with that’s the path our kids need to take. I’m sorry, but I just don’t buy into the message! What have we gotten so far for this national message of everyone needs to go to college? A Trillion dollars in student debt. Graduates that need a 6 figure salary or a job that will pay off their student debt as part of the salary package and won’t take a entry level job to work their way up because it’s beneath them. 3 million skilled trade jobs that are unfilled. These are pretty ugly figures, but all our national leaders want to do is throw money at the trillion dollar debt ... read more

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Directing Traffic

While directing traffic is best left to trained public agency personnel, at times towers find themselves in a situation where these trained personnel are not available. This is why towers commonly carry cones and flares with them. CONES: Traffic cones are best used during short-term traffic directions, specifically when traffic is already blocked, moving slowly or when there is a potential for fire hazard. Cones should be a minimum of 18” tall with reflective strips. However, more effective are the 28” cones with reflective strips, as they will be more visible from farther away. When placing cones, it is best to start by placing the first cone the furthest away from the incident you need to block and then work your way back to incident; stopping every 20’ to 25’ to place another cone. (In slower traffic conditions, the cones can be placed closer together.) FLARES: For towers to protect themselves at larger incidents or when traffic i ... read more

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